It's almost that time of the year again when temperatures start to plummet and many of us neglect our outdoor spaces. However, if you're serious about garden landscaping, then some simple strategies could be all you need to make sure yours stays in top condition.

Spending a few minutes dead-heading flowers and stems will give them a new lease of life.

A few hours of garden DIY could ultimately make your garden more manageable when spring comes around - it's time you'll be glad you spent when your space is the envy of all your neighbours!

Cut back any dead stems

You're likely to find that many of your favourite plants have started to die off, but there is a way of giving them a better chance of survival when winter comes around. Spending a few minutes dead-heading flowers and stems will give them a new lease of life when flowering season starts to pick up pace.

It will also help reduce the likelihood of the plants become affected by pests and diseases. Some of the most common you're going to come across in Australian gardens are black spot, which typically affects roses, and anthracnose, which could cause problems for your fruit and veggies.

Plan next season's produce

Talking of growing your own, now is the ideal time to think about which fruits and vegetables you'd like to be serving up next spring and summer. It's a pastime that's swept the nation over the past few years, as a survey from The Australia Institute discovered.

Research findings showed that 52 per cent of Australian households are growing some of their own food, while a further 13 per cent plan to do so in the future. The main motivators behind this trend emerged as increased demand for healthier food, saving money and having tastier meals.

It's essential that you make your spring planting decisions based on where in the country you live. As About the Garden explains, subtropical areas can benefit from growing beetroot, cabbage and sweet potato. Cooler regions, on the other hand, may have more success with the likes of strawberries, zucchini and tomato.

Prepare your garden for growing fruit and veggies.Prepare your garden for growing fruit and veggies.

Once you've decided exactly what you're going to plant, you could attempt a spot of garden DIY and create a raised bed of your own. This will make it easier to sow the seeds in lines and, when the time comes to start picking, will mean you don't have to bend down quite so far!

Invest in some water storage strategies

Winter often brings with it high levels of rainfall, which you should be taking whatever step possible to recycle. Water butts are a popular means of doing just that and could be the answer to reducing your bills in the long run.

Research from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) shows that although people are serious about cutting down on their water usage in the home, the same can't be said for the garden.

"While most Australian households (79 per cent) took at least one step to save water inside or outside their home in the last 12 months, there had been a change in behaviour when it came to saving water in the garden," noted Mark Lound from the ABS.

"This may have been due to the easing of drought conditions and water restrictions in many areas."

One reason you might not have been too keen on the idea of a water butt in the past is the impact it could have on your garden landscaping. Hiding it behind a screen or buying one with an easily camouflaged colour scheme means this doesn't have to be the case.

If you're in an area that is likely to be affected by drought, you'll soon realise what a savvy winter purchase this turned out to be!